Courses

At the beginning of the twenty-first century the uses of thehuman body, its organs, tissues and cells are increasingly diversified. One can observe the worldwide presence of old uses and misuses of the human body, such as prostitution, organ trafficking, human trafficking but more and more also new forms of...
Instructor: Judit Sandor
Credits: 4.0
The PhD Preparation Seminar is a mandatory course for first-year PhD students in Comparative Gender Studies at CEU. It is a workshop-style course designed to guide probationary doctoral students through the conceptualization and development of the PhD Thesis Proposal and accompanying Fields and Themes Paper, the...
Instructor: Éva Fodor
Credits: 2.0
The aim of this seminar is to help students with the writing of their dissertation. Each student presents at least one (draft) chapter, together with a (draft) table of contents, which will help clarify the function of the chapter in the thesis, and the chapter’s and thesis’s overall arguments.The seminar’s core...
Instructor: Eszter Timár
Credits: 2.0
The course seeks to help you develop as a writer within the English-speaking academic community by raising awareness of, practicing, and reflecting upon the conventions of written texts. As well as an introduction to critical thinking and critique writing, the course will also develop your awareness of conventions of...
Credits: 1.0
Academic Writing Part 2  Group 1, 2, 3
Instructor: Hadley Z. Renkin
Credits: 1.0
Aims and ObjectivesThe aim of this course is to provide students from the 2nd year of their studies onwards with the skills necessary for completing a successful Gender dissertation in a timely fashion and to help students develop writing skills that they can use after the completion of their studies. 
Instructor: Andrea Kirchknopf
Credits: 2.0
This in an introductory course in the developing field of studies on communism and gender, in which we will explore historical, theoretical and global perspectives on the topic.Mainstream narratives about communism in Europe or China depict it as oppressive, gloomy, and a failure. In 1956 Soviet leader Joseph Stalin’s...
Instructor: Francisca de Haan
Credits: 2.0
Mandatory for MATILDA students.The aim of the course is to investigate theoretical and methodological problems related to the knowledge production in post-disciplinary age.The first part of the course is dealing with the concept of interdisciplinarity and its different interpretations. The conceptual differences...
Instructor: Jasmina Lukic
Credits: 2.0
This course is one of the mandatory courses in the field of methodology. It focuses on the interdisciplinary category of ‘discourse’ that conceptualizes the use of various sign systems as an integral part of social events. The major aim on the one hand is to explore how discourse as an explanatory category in...
Instructor: Erzsébet Barát
Credits: 2.0
Elective courseThe main aim of this course is to familiarize students with how the abstract legal principle of equality is turned into policy and practice. Starting from what equality means as a basic legal principle and right in modern democratic systems, the course will move on to critically analyze the policy...
Credits: 2.0
This course is about the making of the global gender equality regime and the ways in which it shapes and is shaped by feminist activism in different world regions that are hierarchically positioned vis-à-vis each other. It covers the period starting with the UN International Women's Year in 1975 until the present day...
Instructor: Selin Çağatay
Credits: 2.0
What do memorial displays for those who died from AIDS tell us about public mourning as a political measure of the (disavowed) sexuality? How might performances of dancers and other artists with disabilities challenge the normative perception of gendered and racialized desire/desirability? How do bio-artistic,...
Instructor: Hyaesin Yoon
Credits: 4.0
This is an introductory course, which is designed to familiarize students with some of the basic concepts and arguments in the broad interdisciplinary field of “gender studies”.   The first part of the course will address different understandings of the concept of sex/gender in an effort to introduce students to the...
Instructor: Éva Fodor
Credits: 4.0
Building on the FGS I, this course explores major contributions in feminist scholarship after the first and second waves of feminism. In this course, we will discuss the feminist inquiries that emerge from questioning the universal category of “woman,” tracing the multiple (and sometimes conflicting) approaches to...
Instructor: Eszter Timár
Credits: 2.0
This 4-credit course builds upon the foundations from the fall semester “Gender and Migration” course in order to reexamine the neoliberal state with regards to the ‘new refugee crisis’. In this special topics course, we will explore and seek to connect a long history of neoliberal development and worsening global...
Instructor: Nadia Jones-Gailani
Credits: 4.0
This course examines some of the major theoretical approaches to and empirically grounded analyses of the ways in which national/ist discourses and practices are gendered and sexualized. The course approaches the concept of nation and its close variants – ethnic and cultural identities, nation-states, citizenship and...
Instructor: Elissa Helms
Credits: 4.0
Mandatory and open for MA 2 year students in their 2nd year Applied Gender Studies track (the internship itself may be scheduled in the period between spring of year 1 and early autumn year 2)
Instructor: Hadley Z. Renkin
Credits: 8.0
At the beginning of the 21st century the emerging new technologies have become inherently political. Neuroscience, genetics (genetic testing, screening, and DNA fingerprinting), the various assisted reproductive technologies, nanotechnology, robotics, information technologies, and their combination now constitute...
Instructor: Judit Sandor
Credits: 4.0
Mandatory and open for MA 2 year students in their 2nd year Applied Gender Studies track
Instructor: Hadley Z. Renkin
Credits: 2.0
One of the main theoretical anchor points of poststructuralist feminist and queer theory is the Foucauldean insight that power, conceived of as a dynamically shifting system of force relations, is everywhere. A corollary of this insight concerns the necessary rethinking of our conventional understandings of what...
Instructor: Eszter Timár
Credits: 2.0
This two-credit PhD course is a mandatory requirement for students in the first year of the PhD program in Comparative Gender Studies. Its aim is to critically interrogate the relationship between theoretical concepts, methodological approaches, and research outcomes with the underlying goal of incorporating...
Instructor: Elissa Helms
Credits: 2.0
In this 4-credit course, we will identify and trace the centrality of gender to the processes and problematics of colonialism, postcolonialism, nationalism and transnationalism, and the ways in which feminism(s) have been shaped both by and within these different contexts. Postcolonial scholarship emerged in the wake...
Instructor: Nadia Jones-Gailani
Credits: 4.0
Mandatory Public Lecture SeriesThese are talks organized throughout the academic year that are also open to the CEU community. They are given by scholars from other universities and are a way for the students and faculty to learn about current research in the field of gender studies and to engage in dialogue with...
Instructor: Faculty, staff
Credits: 1.0
This 2- credit course will explore multiple and intersecting methods that are used to listen, record and interpret oral histories and life narratives, with a particular focus on feminist methods that uncover silenced, vulnerable and marginalized voices. In this methods seminar, students are encouraged to consider the...
Instructor: Nadia Jones-Gailani
Credits: 2.0
What do major environmental crises, like pollution, extinction, climate change or depletion of natural recourses have to do with the embodied notions of sexuality, gender, and race? What is the role of discourses on Nature in shaping the situated and site-specific understandings of sexuality/gender/race, and how have...
Credits: 2.0
Core course in feminist theory for GEMMA students.This course will look at the political stakes in the division between heterosexuality and other forms of sexuality in particular and interrogates the category of “normal” in general. It is organized around some key concepts fuelling both the thinking of sexuality and...
Instructor: Eszter Timár
Credits: 4.0
Social movements and social activism are critical to political engagement and social transformation. Traditional social science approaches to social movements and social change have tended to frame forms of collective resistance and protest primarily as either irrational, spontaneous reactions to oppression, or as...
Instructor: Hadley Z. Renkin
Credits: 4.0
The course examines the concept of performativity, one of the important terms in our research of gender and sexuality. The course traces its development in philosophy, its introduction to feminist and queer inquiry, and examines its complicated relationship to the concept of nature: we will look at the development of...
Instructor: Eszter Timár
Credits: 2.0
Few aspects of early modern statecraft left more traces in written and visual sources than the activities of diplomats and those who represented states in less official capacity. Traditional historiography has connected the history of diplomacy with the rise of the nation state, bureaucrats, and official documents...
Instructor: Jan Hennings
Credits: 4.0
Mandatory for all graduating MA students. (NB: the workshop will meet March 13-22, 2017 for second year students in 2-year programs. One-year students take TWW in May)This course is a practical workshop designed to help students further their thesis writing in a timely manner, to become aware of potential problems in...
Instructor: Francisca de Haan
Credits: 4.0
Mandatory for all graduating MA students. For 1-year MA students and GEMMA, Matilda defending in September. Takes place: May 8-12. Details TBA)  The main aim of the workshop is to help you in the process of writing your MA thesis. Each student presents a (draft) chapter, together with a (draft) table of contents (ToC...
Instructor: Hadley Z. Renkin
Credits: 4.0
Part of Mandatory “Foundations in Historical Methods and Theories” for Matilda students.This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the field of women’s and gender history and its main concepts, theories and approaches, and to familiarize them with the challenges and (hopefully)...
Instructor: Francisca de Haan
Credits: 2.0